Holy Week

Faith makes so much possible; it keeps despair at bay and allows hope to thrive.  We all do well to have something to believe in.

I grew up Catholic, then lapsed, then returned, then took up permanent residence at a distance.  I remember with fondness today my earlier days of devout worship.  I also accept the painful truth that while faith can truly inspire us, the human institutions that arise around it will invariably compromise it.

Every year during Holy Week, I recall the profound truths of Christianity, along with its powerful symbols.  One need not believe in the literal death and resurrection of the historical Jesus of Nazareth in order to understand the transcendent nature of the human soul.  One need not believe that this particular man of Galilee was the only son of God in order to recognize the divine presence in every human being.  Indeed, if the crucifixion had never occurred, the cross itself would still represent what Joseph Campbell explained to be the intersection of the human and divine planes.

All of this, plus the most meaningful teachings of this itinerant rabbi represent something too vast to be claimed by a worldly framework of authority.  Once genuine devotion turns to doctrine, the threat of dogma looms.

For any representative of faith to deny the sacrament of Holy Communion to any sinner would contradict the very truth of that sacrament–that all human beings are worthy of redemption.  For any representative of faith to keep any worshiper at a distance because of petty proprieties related to lifestyle, politics, or doctrinal dissent would reject Jesus’s very example to welcome everyone into his blessing.  The adulterers, the tax collectors, and the unclean of twenty centuries ago have their equivalents in the people most harshly judged in our society today.

Any institution of faith that denies the priestly ministry to anyone based on their sins, their gender, their marital status, or whom they love denies that very ministry the presence of the divine in the souls of the rejected.

And all of humanity would do well to reflect on the religious pretexts used for injustice, cruelty, war, and genocide throughout human history.  Countless millions have suffered and died in the name of one interpretation of the Almighty being truer than another.

For all of this, however, I know well the good things that can result from genuinely spiritual pursuits, both on an individual level and through genuine, right-minded ministries of various spiritual traditions.  Every desperate soul that comes to know its sacred self, every act of mercy or grace that comes about in this world has a value none of us can even comprehend.

But all of the faithful in all of the spiritual traditions of the world must practice discernment in carrying out what they believe to be God’s work.  At the core of every religion reside the values of acceptance, compassion, and love.

In short, true divinity, while present in all of us, belongs exclusively to no one.  This week, hundreds of millions of people will celebrate the death and resurrection of someone who suffered on a cross for this very principle.

9 thoughts on “Holy Week

  1. Golden: “Every desperate soul that comes to know its sacred self, every act of mercy or grace that comes about in this world has a value none of us can even comprehend.”

    I like this: “I grew up Catholic, then lapsed, then returned, then took up permanent residence at a distance.” A whole spiritual/religious autobiography in a sentence.

    Beautiful. Thanks for this. Cheers to acceptance, compassion and love.

  2. Truer words were never written : . I also accept the painful truth that while faith can truly inspire us, the human institutions that arise around it will invariably compromise it.

    This happens, unfortunately, and I often remind myself that the church will not be standing at the gates with me – I alone will be there. Sometimes that makes my heart feel better about the hurts that happen.

    1. Yes, it is such a balance. Religious institutions are imperfect and can do harm, yet they can also serve as a framework to help people grow spiritually. All of this reflects the human condition, I suppose. Happy Easter!

  3. “then took up permanent residence at a distance” – this is where I am, but I didn’t know how to express it.

    Being in Catholic education for 36 years has been a blessing and a challenge. It took me a long time to separate spirituality and divinity from the institution. The God I believe in would not be excluding the sinners, He would be washing their feet. Witnessing that action on Holy Thursday evening has brought me to tears at times – thinking about being the receiver of mercy as well as the giver. My daughter told me a long time ago that she can be spiritual without being religious. She is so right; it just took me longer to figure out.

    Thank you for a beautiful Holy Week reflection. Happy Easter!

  4. I connected with your first sentence so hard because of the truth of it. Being raised Roman Catholic has been a challenge. It is only recently that I found my way back to Christ and am so thankful for it. For too long, I allowed the human institution to taint it for me, losing sight of the real truth and the importance of that. Well written.

  5. You are right in that humans make an unholy mess of religion. Much evil has been done – is still being done – in the name of it. My husband preaches that Christianity is not (or wasn’t supposed to be) a religion but a relationship with Christ. I find this echoed in your words: “This itinerant rabbi represent[s] something too vast to be claimed by a worldly framework of authority.” It reminds me of what a child said once about a blank paper before him: “I wanted to draw a picture of God but he won’t fit on the page.” Humanity tries, with broken crayon-stubs, systematically pushing aside the colors of forgiveness and loving one another as God loves us. “All human beings are worthy of redemption” – yes. That’s Jesus on the cross.

    1. Even your comments are poetry, Fran! “Humanity tries, with broken crayon-stubs, systematically pushing aside the colors of forgiveness and loving one another as God loves us.” Holy smoke! Thanks for adding that insight as a response to my post.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s